Strategies for treating pregnant women with hepatitis B and C

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Abstract

This multilateral review provides current knowledge regarding pregnancy and infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV), as well as discusses modern methods to reduce mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of these infections. Maternal HBV or HCV infection is associated with adverse outcomes of pregnancy and childbirth, including MTCT. In countries, including the United States, where postpartum HBV vaccination and immunoprophylaxis with hepatitis B immunoglobulin have been introduced, MTCT has generally decreased to approximately 5%. Unlike that for HBV infection, there is no available or recommended therapy to reduce the risk of MTCT of HBV infection, and the risk remains at 3–10%. MTCT of HCV can be minimized if do not use obstetric care and avoid birth injuries. Young women with HCV should be referred for treatment after childbirth, and newborns should be closely monitored to rule out infection. New, more affordable, and better tolerated HCV treatment regimens are now emerging that will help reduce the number of infected women and infants.

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About the authors

Vitaliy A. Kaptilnyy

I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University

Author for correspondence.
Email: 1mgmu@mail.ru
ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2656-132X

MD, Cand. Sci. (Med.), assistant professor

Russian Federation, 119991, Moscow

Diana Yu. Reyshtat

I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University

Email: Diana.reyshtat@mail.ru
ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5789-3415

V-year student

Russian Federation, 119991, Moscow

Manana V. Berishvili

I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University

Email: berishvilim@gmail.com
ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0834-0806

MD, Cand. Sci. (Med.), assistant professor

Russian Federation, 119991, Moscow

Mariya N. Zholobova

I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University

Email: angel1345@mail.ru
ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2842-2910

MD, Cand. Sci. (Med.), assistant professor

Russian Federation, 119991, Moscow

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